BUILDING UNDERSTANDING OF CLIMATE VARIABILITY INTO PLANNING OF GROUNDWATER SUPPLIES FROM LOW-STORAGE AQUIFIERS IN AFRICA (BRAVE)

 

Tempane and East Mamprusi Districts 

Northern Ghana

Partners:

The Walker Institute, CARE International and URA Radio (GBC)

Donors:

UPGro, DFID, NERC and ESRC

When:

2018-2020

Target Audience:

Drought prone communities in northern Ghana

Radio Programme:

“Farmer and the Water” on URA Radio, 89.7 MHz

Project Outcomes:

This project is part of a multi-sector initiative to reduce risk and improve the water security resilience of rural communities in sub-Saharan Africa. The BRAVE project combines outputs from state-of-the-art climate and groundwater models (called RAINWATCH) with scientific and indigenous knowledge to develop appropriate tools to support decision makers in communities and households. Farmers' Voice Radio is playing a key role by providing training and stimulating the sharing of locally held information on good groundwater management practices between drought-affected communities in the north of Ghana. Farmer listener groups meet monthly with radio presenters and agricultural extension officers to develop radio programmes that will strengthen the resilience of communities for years to come:

  • promoting rain harvesting techniques, proper storage and conservation of water resources;

  • improving yields, by providing information on drought resistant and early maturing crops;

  • promoting better land management practices to improve soil fertility and water retention

  • improving health and nutrition by promoting high value crops and garden conservation.

A farmer from Jawani, Kasimu Tia, told the project team:

‘I want to thank the project very much for the information they have given us regarding the rainfall for this year. [….] the rain distribution this year has been very good for our crops. Even though last year we received much rain, the seedlings did not do well as this year. This year the distribution is good allowing the seedlings to enjoy both rainwater and sunshine, which are all good for the crops. The forecast has also said that there will not be dry spell spanning over 14 days and this means that this year we will have good rains. This means lowland areas should be used for the cultivation of water loving crops like rice. If you cultivate maize or millet on lowland areas, the chances are that you may not get any good yield.’

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Farmers' Voice Radio is an initiative of the Lorna Young Foundation

 

Farmers' Voice Radio. Lorna Young Foundation. 47 Lea Lane. Huddersfield. HD4 7DP

Contact details

www.lyf.org.uk 

Registered charity no: 1112895  

Company no: 4788426 

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